Monthly Archives: December 2012

Daniel WallaceDr. Dan Wallace has another outstanding post on Bible translation. His work and research are refreshingly real, and he clearly communicates what the Scripture tells us—and what it does not.

Daniel B. Wallace

There’s an old Italian proverb that warns translators about jumping in to the task: “Traduttori? Traditori!” Translation: “Translators? Traitors!” The English proverb, “Something’s always lost in the translation,” is clearly illustrated in this instance. In Italian the two words are virtually identical, both in spelling and pronunciation. They thus involve a play on words. But when translated into other languages, the word-play vanishes. The meaning, on one level, is the same, but on another level it is quite different. Precisely because it is no longer a word-play, the translation doesn’t linger in the mind as much as it does in Italian. There’s always something lost in translation. It’s like saying in French, “don’t eat the fish; it’s poison.” The word ‘fish’ in French is poisson, while the word ‘poison’ is, well, poison. There’s always something lost in translation.

But how much is lost? Here I want to explore…

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Habits of the Hobbit Heart

J. R. R. Tolkien wrote his first children's book about Middle Earth in 1937.  Popular film director Peter Jackson adapted a modern retelling of the tale to the big screen in 2012.

J. R. R. Tolkien wrote his first children’s book about Middle Earth in 1937. Popular film director Peter Jackson adapted a modern retelling of the tale to the big screen in 2012.

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote the books, and film director Peter Jackson has put them on the big screen. The Lord of the Rings trilogy and now The Hobbit have made a huge mark at the box office. But did you know that Tolkien was instrumental in the conversion of C. S. Lewis to the Christian faith?

Tolkien, a Roman Catholic,  and Lewis, an atheist, were both veterans of World War One and eventually colleagues at Oxford. Tolkien took a late night walk with Lewis and another friend, during a period in 1931 when Lewis was questioning his atheism. Lewis had a great deal of interest in ancient myths and the truth hidden in such stories. Within days, Lewis committed his life to Jesus Christ, owing much of his conversion to his conversation with his friends.
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Peace

The Veracity blog is all about sharing, so for Christmas I’d like to share a gift that we all need so desperately—peace.

The Death of Jumbo by Sue Coe, 2007

The Death of Jumbo by Sue Coe, 2007

This year there’s no shortage of personal train wrecks and tragedies among my family and friends.  Through death, sickness, the collapse of relationships, or just the passage of time, many of them are dealing with insidious loneliness. And everyone has troubles. Yogi Berra was right, “The future ain’t what it used to be.” They’re all carrying on, but they all need peace. Just like you and me.

Peace isn’t linked to our circumstances—although a lot of misery certainly can be.  Some of the most peace-filled people I know have pretty difficult worldly circumstances.  But peace runs deeper than our circumstances.  Much deeper. Continue reading


Have a Merry Mithras!?

Roman bas relief from 2nd or 3rd century depicting Mithras, a central figure of the "Mystery Religions" of the early Christian era, killing a bull.

Roman bas relief from 2nd or 3rd century depicting Mithras, one of the gods of the “Mystery Religions” of the early Christian era, killing a bull.

Who was born on December 25th? Born of a virgin in a stable with shepherds present? Who had twelve disciples? Who was killed and buried in a tomb, and then rose up three days later after his death? Students of the Bible might think the answer is obvious. Not so, according to a popular movement known as “mythicism”. For the “mythicists” this original ancient figure is Mithras, a Persian god. Christianity is really just a copycat faith of Mithraism. Should we be wishing one another a “Merry Mithras” instead during the Christmas season?
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Who Created God?

Who created God?  Good question. Atheists fall on their backside thinking this one through.  It’s all in how deeply we can think—specifically being able to think outside the box of our own worldly experiences.  Here…if you’re still wondering, I’ll save you a headache the next time someone asks you—God is transcendent.

Here’s a short video by Oxford mathematician and Christian apologist John Lennox that shows why you might not want to mess with someone who’s wise—particularly when he is wearing a grin.

John Lennox is a delightful, gentlemanly, brilliant and crafty defender of the faith.  He gives atheists fits with his use of logic and his calm, unflappable, charitable demeanor.   In 1962 he attended the last lectures of C.S. Lewis, to whom he is now sometimes compared.  Dr. Lennox can hold his own, and give as good as he gets. Continue reading


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